A little bit of vegan goes a long way

For 2019 do you want a fast way to reduce animal suffering, lower your greenhouse gas emissions and lessen your risk of disease? Going vegan is the answer. You don’t have to be perfect, you don’t have to give up everything; you can start with a vegan meal, work up to a vegan day, week, month – there are no rules.

I went vegan for two weeks, one week more than I did last year, and that for me is progress! I have tried the Gregg’s sausage roll and the Iceland No Bull range, both good, although I’m wondering where their soya comes from, as that can have disastrous environmental impacts. I will be writing to both companies to find out.

My daughter has been supportive and shared her homemade roasted almond nut butter, which is delicious. One of her daughters has now been vegan for over a year and she says she no longer craves cheese and that meat smells ‘manky’.

Overall the two weeks has been successful. I’ve been slightly hungry the whole time as for me the hardest thing was to have enough snacks when I’m rushing around at work. I don’t want to stay completely vegan – it has been a bit limiting for socialising – but I didn’t miss any foods. And my partner has also been supportive and has suggested we stay permanently vegan for a day every week.

Sadly, I couldn’t face a dry January, giving up alcohol, as well as giving up all animal products, so I have a dry February ahead.

Buffer zones between rivers and farms to bring back beavers

Creating a 20m buffer zones between all watercourses and farmed land would leave space for a wide range of wildlife and plants to flourish, including beavers. I will be asking the government (3rd December, Oral Question) to introduce such buffer zones as part of a rewilding of the countryside. Such a move would instantly create natural corridors that would allow rarer species to travel and migrate in response to a changing climate. Continue reading “Buffer zones between rivers and farms to bring back beavers”

Crowdfunder to support Jenny’s work

Please support our work

Unlike MPs, who receive state funding, members of the House of Lords don’t receive any financial support to employ staff or fund office costs.

As the only Green in the House of Lords, covering as many issues as I can, I need staff to help me with research and press work. I have a small, part time team (equivalent to one full time person) who are paid for from donations from people like you. Continue reading “Crowdfunder to support Jenny’s work”

Solar Alliance to light lives of a billion people

I find the ambitions of the International Solar Alliance (ISA) enormously exciting, which is why I organised a Lord’s debate on the UK Government signing up to them.  It is an international agreement, formed at the United Nations by treaty between 121 states. Importantly, the alliance is being led by India, which makes it the first large-scale climate initiative to be led by a ‘developing’ country. Together the signatories seek to raise $1 trillion US dollars for investment in solar power, and by 2030 the treaty aims to provide affordable green energy to a billion people who do not currently have any electricity. These are lofty goals and they demonstrate an understanding that green investment gives the opportunity to significantly increase the living standards of the world’s poorest while protecting the ecological resources on which all our livelihoods depend. So far, all good. Continue reading “Solar Alliance to light lives of a billion people”

Dear Conservatives who care

A few of you have told me that Blue is the new Green. That you have compassion towards animals and want to conserve the beauty of this world.

Last week one of you told me that the budget wasn’t the place to mention climate change, and I was too infuriated to argue, but I’d like to disagree. Every Government statement must mention it because it affects every area of our lives. Energy, housing, agriculture, transport, food, defence, the economy (no business on a dead planet) etc. Continue reading “Dear Conservatives who care”

Rebellion for Life Oct 31

The Extinction Rebellion begins today. A series of Non Violent Direct Action protests organised by academics and many others.

Climate breakdown is officially happening. We have the evidence of arctic glaciers going into meltdown, humanity is destroying bio-diversity, with the 60% decline of animal populations since 1970. Continue reading “Rebellion for Life Oct 31”

Water is too precious to stay in private hands

Putting water back into public hands would not end the need for hosepipe bans, but it would make them a lot less frequent. For starters, there is over £13.5bn paid to shareholders in the past 8 years that could be spent fixing leaking pipes that leaked away 20% of the treated clean water. That’s £13.5 billion, not million. That means pipes fixed, new sewers constructed and prices held down. Continue reading “Water is too precious to stay in private hands”

Fracking, Heathrow and nukes have no place in a modern economy

There are so many urgent actions and recommendation from today’s CCC report on what the government needs to do in order to stay within the UKs legally binding limits for climate change emissions. We know exactly what to do, but are government is still failing to create a modern economy. Continue reading “Fracking, Heathrow and nukes have no place in a modern economy”

Briefing on Heathrow and climate change

Some MPs will argue that it’s okay to expand Heathrow while staying within the national limit for climate change emissions. The Airports Commission did come to this conclusion, but I doubt that these MPs read the report’s smallprint about the squeeze on regional airports and a huge price hike (read more about the nonewrunways campaign). Continue reading “Briefing on Heathrow and climate change”

Clean Air Bill: momentum that can’t be stopped

There is a momentum behind the idea of a new Clean Air Bill that can’t be stopped. My own finalised Bill is being submitted in the Lords, while Geraint Davies MP is putting his forward for its first reading in the Commons. Between them, these two Parliamentary bills cover all the ground. Geraint’s is focused upon the practical measures and changes needed to ensure that we improve human health and includes all those basic steps that the Labour, Conservative and Coalition Government have failed to take in the last eighteen years. My bill enshrines clean air as a human right and would restore crucial environmental principles into UK law, such as polluter pays and the precautionary principle. It also creates an enforcement mechanism with the Citizens Commission which can support individuals and communities who want to take legal action to make their right to clean air a reality. Continue reading “Clean Air Bill: momentum that can’t be stopped”