Action to ban fur and foie gras imports

I recently joined organisations campaigning to save the promised Animals Abroad Bill – which would ban imports of hunting “trophies”, fur, and foie gras as well as the promotion of elephant tourist rides overseas. I joined representatives from the “Don’t Betray Animals” Coalition who launched two enormous balloons, shaped like an elephant and a lion, above Parliament to send a clear message to Boris Johnson that animals need action, not hot air.  

This is in the wake of reports that the government is backpedalling on its pledge to “have and promote the highest standards of animal welfare”

I am trying to keep up the pressure on the government to act on fur and foie gras imports with another set of questions.

“To ask her Majesty’s Government whether a fur import and sales ban, expected in the Queen’s Speech within the Animal’s Abroad Bill, will be legislated for this parliamentary session using other measures.”

To ask her Majesty’s Government when they plan to publish the results of The Fur Market in Great Britain call for evidence.”

To ask her Majesty’s Government whether a foie gras import and sales ban, expected in the Queen’s Speech within the Animal’s Abroad Bill, will be legislated for this parliamentary session using other measures.”

Ban Trophy Hunting now

Animals are not there for our sport, or to be killed for our pleasure. They are part of their environment and we should leave them alone.

·         9 in 10 voters back an immediate ban on trophies

·         British trophy hunters kill lions – many of them bred in captivity and shot in enclosures.

·         They also shoot leopards, giraffes and endangered polar bears.

·         British trophy hunters are among the world’s biggest elephant hunters.

·         Hundreds of animals have been killed by British trophy hunters since the Government announced its pledge to ban trophies in the 2019 Queen’s Speech.

·         40,000+ submissions were made to the Government’s public consultation on trophy hunting, including from scientists, wildlife experts, and people in Africa. Almost 9 in 10 backed a ban.